Frequently Asked Questions

sunset-698501_960_720.jpg
bride-1355473_960_720.jpg

MEET THE EXPERT

For this FAQ section, we have asked Daryl Thomen to give you his expert opinion.

Daryl is a seasoned wedding videographer and video journalist with over a decade's worth of experience filming and editing pivotal moments in people’s lives, from bar and bat mitzvahs, family celebrations, and, of course, weddings.

FAQ

Is a wedding videographer worth it?

A videographer is an investment every couple should make. “It’s motion that makes memories come to life,” says Thomen.

How far in advance should I book my videographer?

If your wedding is in the peak season, you should aim to have your videographer commissioned eight to 12 months ahead of time to save the date. During the low season, you can reserve their services closer in. You also have more wiggle room if you choose a less seasoned professional as they are less likely to be booked up.

Why should I hire a two-person team?

Your coverage will be more comprehensive and your video will have more dimension in that it’ll be shot from an additional perspective. This is great for angle changes for important moments, such as the ceremony, speeches, or formal dance—moments where the focus is on the couple. And because the assistant’s primary role is to shoot b-roll, that also provides a greater opportunity to catch those great reaction shots from the guests.

What other add-ons should I consider?

Raw footage is definitely advised as a supplement, as this means you have every minute of what was shot right in hand. The files can come delivered on a flash drive, CDs, or hard drive, and the cost for those may vary based on your vendor and the medium available. You can ask for it to be included in your package during negotiation, or add it on a la carte at £200-£500.

“It’s well worth it,” Thomen said. “There may have been a moment where Uncle Tony did something funny but it didn’t make the cut, but this way, you’ll have it. And with today’s technology, you can save money by adding in footage to your video for extended cuts or make custom versions, which are popular as anniversary gifts.”

What are the different styles that wedding videos may be shot in?

The standard option is a sequential, chronological video that plays through the major points of the day in order. “Consider the videographer a fly on the wall for this style,” Thomen said, “or a shadow that just trails you throughout the day.” The end result is music-heavy with pops of recorded speech.

Should I opt for a drone?

For grand venues or outdoor weddings, it can add a certain wow factor to the final video. However, bear in mind that of the footage shot, the end result might only include a few seconds of overhead. It’s a luxury splurge at £200-£500 as an add-on in London, and drones are typically only used for venue fly-by and the walk down the aisle.

It’s worthwhile to ask your videographer if they offer drone services and have shot at your venue before if they have general site footage that they can splice into your video at a lower cost. But don’t get your heart too set on either option; drones may not be permitted at your sites since there are restrictions in cities and certain areas that may even include beaches. Your videographer will need to clear permissions with the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) before giving you a solid answer on drone usage.

Should I tip my videographer?

Photographers may share a portion of their tip with their recommended/partner videographer. However, this is not typically the case. Videographers are often not tipped, but gratuities are appreciated. A £50-£200 thank-you is a nice gesture, with £50-£100 going to the lead videographer and £50-£75 for the assistant.

We were on the fence about hiring a videographer for our wedding, and after meeting Jan, we were sold! And we are SO happy that we hired him. Having a video to remember the day allows us to relive the day all over again, and to see the things we did not get to notice / see the day of! 

Robb Walters